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Category Archives: New Media Disruptions

What the media industry can learn about native advertising from mobile games

[Originally posted on The Next Web June 7th 2014]

If you only know about native advertising as it’s described in most major media coverage (such as this recent Wall Street Journal report), you might assume the ad format is little more than ads that resemble Facebook updates, or sponsored articles attached to genuine editorial. Indeed, native ads were implicated in the recent strife at the venerable New York Times.

There’s a rich irony to this narrow definition: The New York Times itself, along with every other major media publication, is desperate to shore up its revenue base, especially as the market shifts to mobile – but still largely view native ads as a devil they may need to make a deal with, but only at a painful compromise to their editorial values.

It doesn’t have to be this way, because game developers (as they often do) have pioneered a workable direction. If media companies followed their lead, perhaps they’d earn more revenue without further blurring the lines of advertising and editorial. And in the process, help save our struggling media industry as a whole.

Continue to read the full post here


Is Google Killing Off Mobile Spam?

[Originally posted on Forbes September 16th 2013]

Google Play Developer Program Policies will be seeing some significant changes this week on September 20, 2013. Rob Weber, co-founder of NativeX, weighs in on a potential $150 million in ad revenue at stake and the impact on the Android market.

“In late August Google GOOG +0.02% announced that they would be changing their developer policies… It’s a bold, big move to catch up to iOS. The ad market has kind of been a grey area on Android,” says Weber. “Some ad networks have become very spammy because Google hasn’t been very stringent to this point. It was pretty much anything goes. This is a jump to improve the user experience and an attempt to catch up to Apple.”

The key aspects of these changes are designed to crack down on all manner of “spammy” ad networks, push notifications, and ads in the notification bar space. This will impact thousands of developers and could cause serious damage to companies reliant on these practices.

Read more at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/danieltack/2013/09/16/is-google-killing-150-million-in-ad-revenue/


NativeX Launches New Video Ad Format

Sponsored Post

Introducing a new Mini Multi-Offer ad format “Triad.” Triad combines the latest mobile video ad technology with NativeX’s industry leading selection of native advertising formats to give users the choice of which ads to engage with. Triad joins the NativeX Discovery Suite to give developers the right ad format to optimize strategic placements in their apps for a more native experience with higher impact.

Read the Full Post Here.

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‘Podbuster’ Ads, Calculated To Make You Hit Pause

[Originally posted by Neda Ulaby on NPR January 12th,  2011]

Call it smart advertising — or bad boundaries. You may have noticed a spike in the number of TV commercials designed to look and feel like whatever show you’re watching. They’re called podbusters, DVR busters or interstitial ads, and they’re designed to remove viewers’ fingers from the fast-forward button during blocks — or “pods” — of ads.

The advent of TiVo and similar devices can be thanked for the rise of the podbusters. About 40 percent of households have DVRs — meaning 40 percent of households can easily zip past commercials. Think of podbusters as speed bumps for ads.

Media consultant Dan Portnoy got caught while watching one of his favorite shows — the AMC drama Mad Men. That evening, he was speeding through the commercials as usual when he saw guys in ’60s fashions in a familiar-looking office, and he thought the program had started again. So he stopped fast-forwarding. What he saw looked like Mad Men. It sounded like Mad Men. But it was an ad for shampoo.

Read more at: http://www.npr.org/2011/01/12/132838343/podbuster-ads-calculated-to-make-you-hit-pause


History of PPC with GoTo.com

[Originally posted by John Rampton on PPC.org November 20th,  2011]

So as it turns out, we get the question quite a bit about something that you may get surprised with.  That would be: “Where did PPC really start?”  Well, when I thought about it, I didn’t actually know for sure the best answer to that question, only a few points.  So we dug in the history books and came up with the History of PPC with GoTo.com, and how everything went from there on out, to evolve to the PPC world we now know.

Before getting started on the timeline, we better make sure we are all on the same page as far as what PPC actually is!  PPC or Search Engine Marketing is basically a process of gaining traffic by purchasing ads on search engines. Basically, the three biggest network operators now are Google Adwords, Yahoo Search Marketing, and Microsoft Ad Center.  Obviously, Google owns much of the market.  With that established, let’s explore how this all came about!

-1997: GoTo.com launches. GoTo.com was founded by ideaslabs.

Basically, GoTo.com was an Idealab Spin Off, and was the first kid on the block to provide Pay-for-Placement Search Service.

Read more at: http://ppc.org/history-of-ppc-with-goto-com/


How AirBnB Became a Billion Dollar Company

[Originally posted by Dave Gooden on davegooden.com May 31st,  2011]

Disclosure 1: I work in the vacation rental industry. While my company specializes in regional, recreational vacation homes, not metro rentals – there is an obvious conflict.

Disclosure 2: This is an opinion piece. This post is just my opinion along with some evidence to support it. Judge for yourself.

Yesterday AirBnB announced that they raised $100M at a $1B valuation. This is a huge, huge accomplishment – but a lot of entrepreneurs are probably asking how they did it. Was it their awesome design? Excellent idea? Was it their uncanny business acumen? Just dumb luck?

My Answer: Craigslist Spam!

I believe AirBnB used multiple gmail accounts to spam craigslist and grow their site to a one billion dollar valuation.

Read more at: http://davegooden.com/2011/05/how-airbnb-became-a-billion-dollar-company/